Posts Tagged ‘German Beetle’

Maginot Line Anomaly

In analyzing any world development, we have to keep in mind that HR’s FED looks at the world as a game board and studies the moves it plans to make long in advance. For instance, when the Maginot Line was built on France’s German border prior to WWII, China, Japan and Germany were very much on HR’s mind. And to better understand what was going on, we need only ask why the French decided to build such an archaic and costly structure as the Maginot Line. It was at a time when air and tank warfare was already well established, so why didn’t the French build tanks and airplanes instead of a wall? If they had, the French superiority would have been insurmountable and Germany would have been stopped dead in its tracks, as any military strategist will confirm. Colonel Charles de Gaulle had written a book in 1934 in which he advocated mobile mechanized warfare involving tanks and aircrafts. One of his proposals was the construction of a light, high-performance D-2 tank instead of the heavier B-1s, which cost three times more. The Maginot Line, which cost around seven billion (1939) francs, could have been used to finance the construction of nine thousand D-2 tanks and the equivalent of one thousand Spitfire aircrafts. That, added to the fifteen hundred or so aircrafts and the thousands of tanks France already had, would have been overwhelming. Furthermore, the French were leaders in tank warfare; their WWI FT17, the first tank with a turret, was copied worldwide and in WWII, the B-1bis tank easily outperformed the German tanks.

 

When HR’s FED started promoting and financing the Maginot Line in 1930, in view of waging WWII, it was also financing the huge armament machine in Germany. It knew its plan would make it possible to get two birds with one stone. It knew that getting an isolationist U.S. to attack Japan, or even getting the U.S. to wage another war in Europe, would be next to impossible. But what if Japan attacked the U.S.?

 

If the Maginot Line were constructed, it would allow Germany to skirt around it, go through France, and conquer the allies with lightning speed. A very desperate Japan, facing a total embargo, would feel confident in having an “invincible” Germany as an ally and would be tempted to attack the U.S. If it did, not only would the U.S. have to go to war against the Japanese Empire, but it would likely get involved in the European conflict while it was at it. So as expected, in 1941, after seeing how easily Germany had defeated the allies and faced with the devastating embargo imposed on it by HR’s FED, Imperial Japan decided to act aggressively by attacking Pearl Harbor in December of that year. Not surprisingly, Japan was totally destroyed while the U.S. suffered one hundred and six thousand casualties. After the 1945 bombings, during which over five hundred thousand Japanese civilians died, Japan was occupied by U.S. forces and transformed into a market economy, but similar to post-war Germany, it was a country without a military. HR’s FED then opened the credit tap and turned the tiny archipelago into the second greatest economy on the planet.  German and Japanese cars flooded America in no time. The Japanese products were shoddy at first, but in just a few years, quality control got things right. HR’s FED transformed two broken down bankrupt countries into superpowers overnight, just like they did recently with China. Who are the real supermen?

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